Greetings! It is Friday again, which means it is time for our weekly Five for Fridays where I usually highlight interesting food and nutrition articles of the week. But this week I want to highlight 5 interesting comments from readers of this blog which they wrote last year on different articles. Your comments inspire me and add so much value to my articles that it would be a shame to keep them buried in the archives! Plus, this is a good way to recognize those who take the time to leave a thoughtful comment. Many of them have blogs of their own, which I highly recommend you to visit via the links in each of the titles below.

I will be highlighting more comments in future posts; for now, enjoy these 5 insightful comments. If I did not pick your comment, just hang in there and look out for another post in future. And of course, feel free to share your opinions in a comment!

In response to my review of popular toddler multivitamins,  Tommy’s Mommy recommended paying attention to the recommended dosage

What a good guide to vitamins! My 11-yr-old has been taking Centrum Kids for years because he is my picky eater. I just tried it with my toddler because he has had a bad cold and hasn’t been eating like his normal self the last few days. A couple of observations…

I think you’ve addressed this, but parents need to make sure they check the dosage of vitamins. I cut one Centrum in half for my toddler as per instructions. Secondly, he loved the sweet, tasty vitamin so much he cried when I didn’t give him another. I don’t think I’ll give him any more when he’s eating well again.

Jenna of KidAppeal shared her enthusiasm for leeks and offered these interesting tips when she read my recipe for leeks with olive oil

I love leeks! thx for sharing this recipe. i tell the boys they are “ginormous” onions. eating super huge food is fun for kids. if your recipe doesn’t use all all your leeks, wash them, slice them and put in a zip lock back and store in freezer. take out a handful when you need them to saute and flavor sauces, soups, etc.

members of the onion family are also anti-bacterial by making the body inhospitable to bad bacteria that causes illness. eat onions/leeks to stay free from illness.

TTD-you could make a larger recipe and freeze half for a quick supper that only requires re-heating the next week!

When a reader asked about healthy superfoods for a 12 month old, registered dietitian Milton Stokes offered these additional details to his expert article about retooling your toddler’s diet effortlessly

Nothing beats breastfeeding. So good for you and your baby! Weaning may take place during the 6 – 12 month range.

For the one-year mark, it’s time for solids. At this point your child should eat during normal meal times and eat with the family where the family eats. Texture should be soft, chopped and/or easily gummed depending upon dentition. Avoid making separate, special meals just for your child. Some variation of the family’s meal is preferred. In other words, don’t create a routine of being a short-order cook.

An introduction of up to 20 times may seem excessive, but it’s not. As I said before, what a parent eats–how she models food consumption–is far superior to anything else. I discourage emphasizing certain foods as “good” or “bad,” or using food for any purpose other than nourishment. (For example, refrain from rewarding with food.)

Now, to actually answer your question: nothing is more “super” than fruits and veggies and whole grains. You may need to present them differently and call them different names. Instead of apples, call them “apple smiles” or “smiley fruit.” Or you could cook the apple in the microwave and fill the center with oats, a little brown sugar, and a sprinkle of cinnamon. Call it the “apple cave.” Additionally, you can slice bananas and call them “wheels” or “flying saucers.” Another common one is “trees” for broccoli. (Cook and/or chop tough foods to prevent choking.)

Do you have a garden. Let your daughter help you. “Help” may mean play in the dirt, but at least it’s some exposure. Little by little her diet will change/improve. Just note: her stomach only holds a tiny bit of food compared to an adult’s, so you don’t have to worry if she only eats a couple cooked carrot sticks.

Kayris offered this simple recipe for a greek-style salad with quinoa when she read my review article quinoa – the unrecognized superfood

We love quinoa, and it IS so eay to prepare.

My favorite way to make it is in this Greek-style salad:
One cup quinoa, cooked as directed (or you can sub any other grain, I have made this with bulgur and also with couscous)
1 cucumber, chopped (peel it if you like)
1 large tomato, chopped
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
Italian or Greek salad dressing until saturated (I usually use homemade Italian dressing)

Alina shared her success with herb tea instead of sugary drinks in response to shaking off a sweet addiction

I introduced herbal teas to my daughter who is now 16 months old. I wanted to offer her something different than just water and milk. And I didn’t want to go with juice which is so sweet, even when diluted. So I have offered her some basic, caffeine-free herbal teas such as chamomile. You can add ice as a refreshing cool drink or serve warm or at room temperature.

Like any new foods, I had to offer it to her many many times before she actually drank it. I think that’s where some parents go wrong with juice — it’s sweet so the child will drink it right away. But I have found my toddlers will eat non-sweet foods (or drinks), it just may take longer for them to like the taste. Also it really helps when they can see you drinking the same thing. And with tea, there is the fun part of preparing the tea…. adding the tea bag, waiting for it to steep, adding some ice, etc!

To any parents who would like to try offering tea in a sippy cup, make sure to read the label carefully because some herbal teas do contain caffeine or other “odd” ingredients.

Enjoy and let me know what is on your mind.

Photo Source: Just chaos on Flickr via everystockphoto

©2010 Littlestomaks.com

2 comments

  1. Interesting point about vitamins. I know of some kids who think they are candy and want to distribute them to their friends! Uuuggh.

    Thanks for the leaks recipe and tips from Milton. My toddler is getting into food jags and only eats apple sauce, yogurt, some fruits, and raisin bran cereal. I know it could be worse, and I keep telling myself that it’s a phase, but it’s good to hear it over again and be encouraged to offer him chicken or veggies.

  2. Interesting point about vitamins. I know of some kids who think they are candy and want to distribute them to their friends! Uuuggh.

    Thanks for the leaks recipe and tips from Milton. My toddler is getting into food jags and only eats apple sauce, yogurt, some fruits, and raisin bran cereal. I know it could be worse, and I keep telling myself that it’s a phase, but it’s good to hear it over again and be encouraged to offer him chicken or veggies.

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