Help! My Kids Don’t Eat Enough Fruits and Veggies!

by TwinToddlersDad on January 23, 2009

in Helpful Tips

This is a guest post by Dr. Ayala Laufer-Cahana, M.D., who blogs about nutrition and health on her website Ayala’s Herbal Water. She is a Pediatrician, Mom and very interested in nutrition and the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle.

Tomatoes

TwinToddlersDad and I have been chatting about the troubling finding that, although many Americans know they should be eating more fruits and veggies (F&V), only 11% actually meet the recommended minimum of 5 servings a day.

This is a common concern parents voice nowadays—a recent poll in this blog shows “not enough F&V” as the number one nutrition concern—and that’s actually encouraging. There’s no better time to address the issue of good nutrition than childhood.  This is the time when eating habits are formed, and what we do as parents can be a lifelong gift of healthy eating and better overall health for our kids.

I think there’re plenty of reasons why many American kids don’t jump with joy at the sight of F&V:

  • Culinary culture and habits: In countries where F&V are central in the diet—Mediterranean countries for instance—everyone eats more produce (or at least did before the Western diet invaded).  Kids eat what their parents eat, and we live in a place in which F&V are on the backstage at best.
  • Advertising and marketing: Kids are exposed to thousands of ads for foods and beverages.  In fact, food companies spend some $900 million annually on television ads tailored to children under 12.   Most of the ads preach about foods that have low nutritional value, and almost none of the ads promote F&V. We’d love to think our kids don’t pay attention, but the repeated messages do have an effect, and the overriding theme they’re hearing again and again is that highly processed foods are fun, will make them feel good, and taste amazing.  If the same amount of money and talent targeted all of the good things about F&V, I think we’d get kids nagging for an apple (the fruit, I mean; mine are already in the habit of nagging for the other kind of Apple).
  • Availability: We’re surrounded by food.  There are food-purchasing opportunities everywhere.  Yet what’s readily available is junk food and sugary drinks; good produce is—for many—hard to find. Low income neighborhoods in particular are fresh produce deserts.  If fresh F&V were as readily available as soda, I bet hungry kids looking for a snack would grab them.
  • Quality: If kids are introduced to F&V through low-quality or poorly prepared examples, they’re unlikely to be tempted to try this food again.  Day-old salads in fast food outlets (often the only F&V option) can taste so bad, one couldn’t imagine that salad could be anyone’s favorite food.  Many people don’t know how good veggies can taste because they’ve never eaten great produce that’s been properly handled.
  • Price: The price of good quality F&V can be prohibitive.  People tend to look (if only subconsciously) at how many calories or satiety their dollars buy.  For $2 you can get an excellent large organic Fuji apple at Whole Foods, or a whole meal at McDonalds. Many will chose the McDonalds meal, or a bag of chips and a soda, as these will fill them up.

So what can we do?

A few tips on how to get your kids to eat more F&V

1. Serve early and often

How early? Flavors from the mother’s diet are transmitted through amniotic fluid and mother’s milk. Studies show that when mothers eat fruit and vegetables during pregnancy and breastfeeding, their babies accept those fruit and vegetables more readily.

Later on, between the age of 6 and 24 months, the infant is usually most receptive to new tastes and textures, so this is the time to introduce many fruits and vegetables. Even if the initial introduction did not go very well, repeated exposure will often get the baby to like the new food.

2. Be a good model

Young children copy us, and for a short while (too short!) will tend to believe whatever we say. Sitting at the family dinner, and pleasurably eating a balanced diet, rich in plant-based foods, will get the message across very well. The fact that in some cultures most young children are excited about spicy and even bitter foods, shows that food preference is not a physiologic absolute, but more of a cultural, habitual behavior. While the preference for sweetness is universal, other preferences can be learned.

3. Let the F&V taste like themselves

Celebrate F&V tastes for what they are, and good quality vegetables are quite often delicious. Cook them simply, or serve them raw. This way your child will learn to like the food for its flavor and texture.

4. Serve the best quality vegetables and fruit you can find

One of the reasons children and adults dislike some dishes, and generalize to a whole family of ingredients, is because of an experience they’ve had with a poor quality fruit or poor preparation of a vegetable.
There is a huge difference between an organically grown local tomato, ripened on the vine and picked just today, and a winter tomato from the supermarket. Overcooked broccoli and Brussels sprouts are bitter and emit unpleasant-smelling sulphur compounds. On the other hand, there’s nothing like fresh, locally grown produce.  Think about it: If the only two movies you saw were bad ones, you might think you don’t like movies.

5. Serve one family meal with no substitutions

Making a “kids menu” is unnecessary and impractical. Beyond infancy, children can be gradually introduced to the family diet, and eat whatever we eat in smaller portions. There is no reason why a toddler should eat bland yellow foods that have cartoons on the package.

A no substitution policy is important for one simple reason: If a toddler is hungry, he will want to eat. If he has no option but the dish on the table, he is much more likely to give it a try. If he can opt for the mac & cheese instead, why would he stretch himself?

6. Involve children in making F&V dishes

Introduce kids to the world of botany and gardening using the vegetable in their dish as a starting point. Take them to the farmers market to meet the people who grow their food. Teach them how to make a good vegetable salad, or how to prepare a nice bowl of boiled edamame for a snack. Encourage them to spend time with you in the kitchen, preparing plant-based foods.

7. Don’t pressure, coax, bribe or reward your child to eat F&V

Pressuring children to eat a particular food actually reduces their interest in and intake of that food, and causes undue tension around the dinner table. Offering a reward, even if it’s just dessert, devalues the means (eating F&V) relative to the reward in the kids’ mind, while what we want them to think is just the opposite.

Encouraging everyone to eat more F&V is one point on which all nutrition experts agree.  The protective effects of fruits and vegetables and a significant number of other health benefits have been confirmed by many studies.  But even disregarding the health attributes of F&V, these plant foods really are tasty, pretty and colorful, and their biology is so fascinating, that there’s really no reason why we shouldn’t all really enjoy them, with the proper introduction.

Good luck with what may sometimes seem to be a long journey towards better kids’ nutrition.

Dr. Ayala

Be Sociable, Share!

  • http://alifelesssweet.blogspot.com/ cathy

    Great suggestions! I have one child that loves fruits and vegetables and is quite adventurous in what she eats, and one that is not a fan of fruits and vegetables and is quite picky and timid in his food choices. It’s frustrating to serve a picky, stubborn eater! I use all of these suggestions daily to varying degrees. They definitely help in the big picture. My picky child does eat more fruits and vegetables because of taking these actions. He’s still picky, and given a choice he’ll still choose a carb or protein or something sugary over fruits and vegetables, but I do feel like we’re making some progress with him.

  • http://alifelesssweet.blogspot.com/ cathy

    Great suggestions! I have one child that loves fruits and vegetables and is quite adventurous in what she eats, and one that is not a fan of fruits and vegetables and is quite picky and timid in his food choices. It’s frustrating to serve a picky, stubborn eater! I use all of these suggestions daily to varying degrees. They definitely help in the big picture. My picky child does eat more fruits and vegetables because of taking these actions. He’s still picky, and given a choice he’ll still choose a carb or protein or something sugary over fruits and vegetables, but I do feel like we’re making some progress with him.

  • http://herbalwater.typepad.com/ Ayala Laufer-Cahana MD

    Cathy, I have a quote for you:
    “You can learn many things from children. How much patience you have, for instance.” ~Franklin P. Jones

    It’s sometimes frustrating how much patience you need, but it really will work out with time, and in the meantime it’s good to know that no healthy toddler starves himself.

    Good luck!

  • http://herbalwater.typepad.com/ Ayala Laufer-Cahana MD

    Cathy, I have a quote for you:
    “You can learn many things from children. How much patience you have, for instance.” ~Franklin P. Jones

    It’s sometimes frustrating how much patience you need, but it really will work out with time, and in the meantime it’s good to know that no healthy toddler starves himself.

    Good luck!

  • http://blondish.net Nile

    I guess I had a good example when I was brought up, but for some reason my son did not pick up the same habit as both his father (my ex husband) and I bought a lot of fresh produce, even things from South and Latin America. However, we supplemented it with vitamins. Luis and I have been consistent despite no longer being married as we agree on a lot of things for Angel’s upbringing. We now ask him to at least try a bite of new foods before deciding to rule them out. So far that has been a success and he even asks for things like corn and apples. :)

    So, I guess I can say that your suggestions are a must do. :)

  • http://blondish.net Nile

    I guess I had a good example when I was brought up, but for some reason my son did not pick up the same habit as both his father (my ex husband) and I bought a lot of fresh produce, even things from South and Latin America. However, we supplemented it with vitamins. Luis and I have been consistent despite no longer being married as we agree on a lot of things for Angel’s upbringing. We now ask him to at least try a bite of new foods before deciding to rule them out. So far that has been a success and he even asks for things like corn and apples. :)

    So, I guess I can say that your suggestions are a must do. :)

  • http://www.dominiquegoh.com Dominique

    I have two extreme cases at home. Elder boy will eat all(most) vegetables while younger boy doesn’t like vegetables. Younger one loves fruits while elder one hates them. It is easy to say to introduce F & V to them when they are young but at such an age where they are still quite resistant to eating BOTH fruit and vegetables I will give them Vit drops just in case.

  • http://www.dominiquegoh.com Dominique

    I have two extreme cases at home. Elder boy will eat all(most) vegetables while younger boy doesn’t like vegetables. Younger one loves fruits while elder one hates them. It is easy to say to introduce F & V to them when they are young but at such an age where they are still quite resistant to eating BOTH fruit and vegetables I will give them Vit drops just in case.

  • http://myspace.com/goddesslaviyah L

    I think #1 holds true because I have never struggled with my children on eating their fruits and veggies. The oldest one loves raw tomatoes and when he asks for seconds he always gets a second helping of salad with the entree. My second son loves sweeter fruits like bananas, dates and pears. He enjoys tomatoes because of the influence of his brother. I love Braeburn apples and my toddler almost always eats half of my plate of sliced apples. I ate a lot of fresh fruits and veggies when I was pregnant with them, but then again that’s how I was raised.

  • http://myspace.com/goddesslaviyah L

    I think #1 holds true because I have never struggled with my children on eating their fruits and veggies. The oldest one loves raw tomatoes and when he asks for seconds he always gets a second helping of salad with the entree. My second son loves sweeter fruits like bananas, dates and pears. He enjoys tomatoes because of the influence of his brother. I love Braeburn apples and my toddler almost always eats half of my plate of sliced apples. I ate a lot of fresh fruits and veggies when I was pregnant with them, but then again that’s how I was raised.

  • Pingback: Empty Calories vs Zero Calories | Babylicious

  • Pingback: My Little Stomach, What Would You Like to Eat Now? | LittleStomaks

Previous post:

Next post: