Cheesy
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Would you offer Cheetos® to your 1 year old? What about soda?

I was at a birthday party this weekend where I noticed someone giving a small child a piece of Cheetos. The child clearly relished the taste as she licked away the last bits of cheese from her mom’s fingers. One point of view could be that it is ok to introduce different tastes at an early age. Others may say that this is how children get hooked on junk food and that is why we have a childhood obesity problem.

What do you think? Do you have a list of forbidden foods you will never let your child eat no matter what?

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7 comments

  1. With my twins turning two this month, I am starting to ease up a bit and allow them to taste some indulgent foods when we are eating them (chips, ice cream), after all, they will need to learn to navigate the waters of balance and satiety as they get older. Before age 2, we definitely worked to keep foods with a lack of nutrients away from them.

    I have been aghast at birthday parties too — and one time watched a parent feed a 5-month-old baby buttercream frosting in a liberal serving.

  2. I never let my kids eat lollipops…. disastrous for their teeth and dangerous to have in the mouths and potentially stuffed down their throats.

  3. Nothing in particular but as much as possible I would not let her eat any junk foods with MSG and sodas.

    I'm making a vegetable sticks for her snacks, it's a good thing that I introduced her to healthy foods at an early stage.

  4. Dr. Ayala

    Great topic!
    I generally don’t forbid foods—I think it might make those foods more desirable and coveted just because they’re forbidden. I make a point of not bringing in the pure junk (soda, sugary drinks and color loaded candy) into my home, and not purchasing it. If it’s served at a party or at someone else’s home I don’t say a word—let the kids have it if they wish.

  5. Dr. Ayala

    Great topic!
    I generally don’t forbid foods—I think it might make those foods more desirable and coveted just because they’re forbidden. I make a point of not bringing in the pure junk (soda, sugary drinks and color loaded candy) into my home, and not purchasing it. If it’s served at a party or at someone else’s home I don’t say a word—let the kids have it if they wish.

  6. 555

    No food in the car – of any kind! A friend was driving down the highway when her 5 year old started to choke on her snack in the back seat! All ended well, once she had managed to safely pull over, get to her daughter & preform the heimlich maneuver….I also was driving in traffic when I started to choke on an apple I was munching on; goes for kids of all ages. No food in the car!

  7. Sophie

    “Forbidden” immediately makes most things irresistible for children of any ages! (Adults, too!) While I talk about nutrition with my daughter, I try not to fuss (or at least hide my cringes) when she does occasionally get her hands on som form of “junk” food. She knows what’s healthy and not, but by allowing her a bit now and then I am not setting her up for cravings by making it off-limits. That said – the only “rule” I have is no hot dogs or milk as a beverage (we use delicious vegan sausages and almond milk as substitues). When shopping, I steer clear off high fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, MSG and anything too refined or processed.

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